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Classical Archaeology | Classical Civilization |Greek | Latin

The Department of Classics is deeply committed to providing students with an excellent graduate and undergraduate education. We offer courses that present a wide variety of perspectives on and approaches to the ancient world. Below is a full listing of graduate and undergraduate courses offered regularly by the department, as well as courses offered by other departments that are related to the Classics. Note that, although many of these courses are offered frequently, not all are taught every year.

CLAR – Classical Archaeology

50 First Year Seminar: Art in the Ancient City (3). This course offers a comparative perspective on the archaeology of ancient Egypt and Bronze Age Greece (3000-1100 B.C.) exploring the public art produced by these two early Mediterranean societies: the Aegean Bronze Age palace centers of Crete and Mainland Greece and the territorial state of ancient Egypt.

110 The Archaeology of Palestine in the New Testament Period (JWST 110, RELI 110) (3). This course surveys the archaeology of Palestine (Modern Israel and Jordan) from the Persian Period (ca. 586 B.C.) to the Muslim Conquest (640 A.D.).

120 Ancient Cities (3). An introduction to Mediterranean archaeology through the examination of archaeological sites from the Neolithic period (ca. 9000 BCE) to the Roman Empire (fourth century CE). The sites, geographic and cultural areas, and chronological periods of study vary depending on instructor. Does not satisfy classical archaeology major degree requirements.

241 Archaeology of Ancient Near East (3). A survey of the cultures of the ancient Near East, Mesopotamia, Anatolia (modern Turkey), and the Levant, from the first settled villages of the ninth millennium to the Persian conquest of Babylon in 539 B.C.

242 Archaeology of Egypt (3). A survey of the archaeological remains of ancient Egypt, from the earliest settlements of the Neolithic period until the end of the New Kingdom.

243 Minoans and Mycenaeans: The Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece (3). A survey of the material culture of Greece, the Cyclades, and Crete from the Paleolithic period (ca. 50,000 years ago) until the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1200 BCE). Primary focus will be the urbanized palatial centers that emerged in mainland Greece (Mycenaean) and the island of Crete (Minoan).

244 Greek Archaeology (3). The historical development of the art and architecture of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period.

245 Archaeology of Italy (3). The historical development of the Italian peninsula as seen in its physical remains, with emphasis upon Etruscan and Roman sites.

246 History of Early Christian and Byzantine Art (3). An introduction to the history of Christian art in Italy and the eastern Mediterranean from the time of Constantine (ca. 300) to the end of the Byzantine Empire (fall of Constantinople in 1453). Major monuments and art forms will be studied with an emphasis on their historical and cultural context.

247 Roman Archaeology (3). This course explores the archaeology of the Roman world between the eighth century BCE and the fifth century CE, focusing on issues of urbanization, trade and consumption, colonization, and the Roman army.

262 Art of Classical Greece (ART 262) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. A chronological study of the main developments of Greek sculpture, architecture, and painting from the fifth to the first centuries BCE.

263 Roman Art (ART 263) (3). The arts of Rome, particularly architecture, sculpture, and painting, proceeded by a survey of Etruscan and Hellenic art and their influence on Rome.

268 Hellenistic Art and Archaeology (3). Survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean from the time of Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest (350-31 BCE), with emphasis on art and architecture of cities and sanctuaries.

375 The Archaeology of Cult: The Material Culture of Greek Religion (RELI 375) (3). This course examines the archaeological context of Greek religion, cults, and associated rituals from the Bronze Age until the Hellenistic period with emphasis on urban, rural, and panhellenic sanctuaries, and methods of approaching ancient religion and analyzing cult practices.

411 Archaeological Field Methods (3). Systematic introduction to archaeological field methods, especially survey and excavation techniques.

440 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3 each). Prerequisite, permission of the department.

460 Greek Painting (ART 460) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A survey of the development of Greek art from geometric to Hellenistic painting through a study of Greek vases, mosaics, and mural paintings.

461 Archaic Greek Sculpture (ART 461) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture during the archaic period.

462 Classical Greek Sculpture (ART 462) (3). Prerequisite, any intermediate-level art history course or permission of instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture during the classical period

463 Hellenistic Greek Sculpture (ART 463) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate-level art history course or permission of instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture in the Hellenistic period.

464 Greek Architecture (ART 464) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 244. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Greek architectural development from the Dark Ages through the fourth century BCE. Special topics include the beginning of monumental architecture, the development of the orders, and interpretations of individual architects in term of style and proportions.

465 Architecture of Etruria and Rome (ART 465) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 245. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The development of architecture in the Roman world from the ninth century BCE through the fourth century CE. The course focuses on the development of urbanism and the function, significance, and evolution of the main building types and their geographic distribution.

470 History & Archaeology of Bathing (3). Cross-cultural survey of the sociocultural and archaeological history of bathing from antiquity (500 BCE) to today, including bathing customs, baths, bathing images, and toilets of different cultures around the world.

474 Roman Sculpture (ART 474) (3). Survey of Roman sculpture (200 BCE to 300 CE), including protraiture, state reliefs, funerary monuments, and idealizing sculpture, with emphasis on style, iconography, and historical development of sculpture in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts.

475 Rome and the Western Provinces (3). Survey of the material remains of the Western provinces of the Roman Empire, with attention to their historical context and significance.

476 Roman Painting (ART 476). Surveys Roman painting from 200 BCE to 300 CE, with emphasis on style, iconography, historical development of painting in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts. Treats current debates in scholarship.

488 The Archaeology of the Near East in the Iron Age (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of the principal sites, monuments, and art of the Iron Age Near East, ca. 1200 to 500 BCE.

489 The Archaeology of Anatolia in the Bronze and Iron Ages (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Anatolian archaeology from the third millennium through the sixth century BCE.

490 The Archaeology of Early Greece (1200-500 B.C.) (3). The course surveys the development of Greek material culture from 1200 to 500 BCE, exploring the origins of Greek art, architecture, cities, and sanctuaries in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean.

512 Ancient Synagogues (JWST 512, RELI 512) (3). Prerequisite, RELI 110. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This is a course on ancient synagogues in Palestine and the Diaspora from the Second Temple period to the seventh century CE.

561 Mosaics: The Art of Mosaic in Greece, Rome, and Byzantium (3). Required preparation, any course in classics, art history, or religious studies. Traces the development of mosaic technique from Greek antiquity through the Byzantine Middle Ages as revealed by archaeological investigations and closely analyzes how this dynamic medium conveyed meaning.

650 Field School in Classical Archaeology (6). This course is an introduction to archaeological field methods and excavation techniques, through participation in acrchaeological excavation.

680 Roman Sculpture (ART 680) (3). (Alternate years) Truemper.

683 Etruscan Art (ART 683) (3). (Alternate years)

781 Aegean Civilization and Near Eastern Backgrounds (3). Issues and problems in the analysis of the material culture of the Aegean from the Neolithic period until the end of the Bronze Age. Haggis.

782 The Archaeology of Dark Age Greece (3). Issues and problems in the analysis of the material culture of Early Iron Age of Greece from the collapse of the Bronze Age palaces to the earliest Greek city states. Haggis.

790 Field Practicum in Archaeology (3). Seminar in archaeological excavation techniques to be conducted in the field. Previous excavation experience is expected. Summer or fall. Haggis; Sams.

794 Greek Topography (ART 794) (3). Study of chief archaeological sites of Greece and of existing buildings and monuments. Attention to the problems of excavation and the role of the sites in Greek history. (Alternate years) Sams.

796 The Archaeology of the Roman Province (3). de Jong.

797 Roman Painting (ART 797) (3). (Alternate years) Truemper.

798 Roman Topography (ART 798) (3). (Alternate years) Staff.

812 Diaspora Judaism in the Roman World (ART 812).

841 Special Reading in Archaeology (3). Fall and spring. Staff.

910 Seminar in Archaeology (3). Topics vary from year to year. Staff.

960 Seminar in Ancient Art (ART960) (3). Fall and spring. Sturgeon.

993 Master’s Thesis (3 or more). Both semesters. Staff.

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3 or more). Both semesters. Staff.

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CLAS – Classical Civilization

52 First-Year Seminar: Happiness: For and Against (3). An investigation of the major differences between Aristotelian and Kantian ethics.

55 First-Year Seminar: Three Greek and Roman Epics (3). This first-year seminar will involve a close reading of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid, and as a transition from Homer to Vergil, students will also read the tragedies of Sophocles from fifth-century Athens.

56 First-Year Seminar: Women and Men in Euripides (3). What can be learned from Greek tragedy about human nature? This first-year seminar will serve, first of all, as an introduction to Euripidean drama in its cultural and historical setting in fifth-century Athens.

58 First-Year Seminar: What’s So Funny? Women and Comedy from Athens to Hollywood (3). This first-year seminar will consider what Greeks and Romans found funny, as well as how that humor translated (or not) into modern America. Students will write and present publicly a short comic play that represents the themes they identify and study in this seminar.

60 First-Year Seminar: Love, War, Death, and Family Life in Classical Myth (3). This first-year seminar studies parent-child relations, gender dynamics, and conflict in mythic families. Students will study these mythic families, looking especially at parent-child relations, gender dynamics, and conflict; the seminar will ask what aspects of ancient culture are revealed by these legends and stories.

61 First-Year Seminar: Writing the Past (3). Translated works of three Greek historians — Herodotus, Thucydides, and Polybius — will provide a lens through which to explore the capacity for literature and other modes of representation to convey history.

62 First-Year Seminar: Barbarians in Greek and Roman Culture (3). A study of Greek and Roman depictions of non-Greeks and non-Romans in both literary and visual sources, with consideration of their origin, development, and social roles.

64 First-Year Seminar: Cinema and the Ancient World (3). In this first-year seminar, students will investigate what films set in classical Roman antiquity say about contemporary culture, and will also attempt to understand their impact on the shaping of our sense of history.

65 First-Year Seminar: The City of Rome (3). This first-year seminar is an introduction to the history and art of the city of Rome from antiquity through the present. Students will survey the entire period, but will look in particular at four specific periods in the city’s life from the early second century CE until the present day.

71 First-Year Seminar: The Architecture of Empire (3). The goal of this first-year seminar will be to examine the architecture of ancient empires, beginning with that of Egypt and ending with the Roman Empire. Analysis will be particularly concerned with the use of architecture as an instrument of empire.

73 First-Year Seminar: Life in Ancient Pompeii (3). A study of this well-preserved ancient site provides an understanding of life in an Italian town during the early Roman empire. Students will study town planning, architecture, the arts, social organization, politics, entertainment, artisanry, commerce, and family life in this first-year seminar.

89 First-Year Seminar: Special Topics (3). Special Topics course; contents will vary each semester.

111 Grammar (1). This course provides a systematic review of English grammar and style for students of Latin and Greek.

121 The Greeks (3 each). Introduction to the history, literature, religion, philosophy, science, art, and architecture of Greece from Homer to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on primary sources.

122 The Romans (3 each). A survey of Roman civilization from the beginning to the late empire, dealing with history, literature, archaeology, philosophy and religion, technology, the economy, and social and political institutions.

123 Summer Study Abroad in Greece (3). Introduction to the history and culture of ancient Greece, from the Bronze Age to the end of the Roman period, through field study of historical and archaeological sites in Greece.

125 Word Formation and Etymology (3). Systematic study of the formation of words from Greek or Latin to build vocabulary and recognition. For medical terminology see CLAS 126.

126 Medical Word Formation and Etymology (3). Systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin roots, to build vocabulary and recognition. For general etymology see CLAS 125.

131 Classical Mythology (3). An introduction to the mythology of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Readings may include selections from Homer, Hesiod, Greek tragedy, and Vergil.

133H Epic and Tragedy (3). First-year honors students only. Study of classical epic and tragedy. Special emphasis on Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and on the rethinking of Homeric epic in the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

231 The Theater in the Greek and Roman World (3). The physical setting and techniques of classical theater: tragedy, comedy, and other public spectacles in Greece and Rome.

240 Women in Greek Art and Literature (WMST 240) (3 each). Course examines law, religion, medicine, social practices, and ideologies in the lives of women in ancient Greece, from Homer to Hellenistic Egypt, using literature, art, and epigraphy.

241 Women in Ancient Rome (WMST 241) (3 each). Course examines the life of women in ancient Rome, from the first beginnings of the organized community in Rome through the early Empire, a period of about 900 years. Also explores aspects of the lives of women in provinces governed by Rome.

242 Sex and Gender in Antiquity (WMST 242) (3). Exploration of gender constructs, what it meant to be a woman or a man, in antiquity, as revealed in literary, historical, and archaeological sources. Readings from Homer, Euripides, Plato, Ovid, Virgil, Juvenal, Petronius, and other ancient authors.

253 The Age of Pericles (3). An introduction to classical civilization through study of its most important period in Greece. Attention to history, philosophy, and art. Lecture and discussion.

254 Alexander and the Age of Hellenism (3). An introduction to classical civilization through study of the period in which it spreads beyond mainland Greece to influence and partially merge with the cultures of the Near East, Egypt, and Rome. Attention to history, literature, philosophy, and art. Lectures and discussion.

257 The Age of Augustus (3). An introduction to classical civilization through study of the literature, history, and art of one of the most crucial periods in Roman history. Lectures and discussion.

258 The Age of the Early Roman Empire (3). An introduction to the civilization of the Roman Empire through study of the literature, history, and archaeology of its most colorful period.

259 Pagans and Christians in the Age of Constantine (3). Introduction to the literature and culture of the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. Special attention to the fundamental cultural and social changes resulting from the Christianization of the Empire.

263 Athletics in the Greek and Roman World (3). Study of athletics as a unifying force in ancient society, emphasizing the Olympic games and other religious festivals. Consideration of athletic professionalism, propaganda, and social trends using literary and archaeological sources.

265 Technology and Culture in the Roman Empire (3). A survey of the state of technology in Rome during the first three centuries CE. Consideration of the interrelationships of technology and government, art, economics, and the quality of life.

361 Homer and the Heroic Age of Greece (3). The Iliad, the Odyssey, Hesiod, heroic and oral poetry. The archaeology of Homeric Greece, the study and influence of the Homeric poems in modern times.

362 Greek Tragedy (3). An introduction to the three great tagedians of ancient Greece and to their historical and cultural context. Discussion is based on close readings of the English translations of selected plays by Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles.

363 Latin and Greek Lyric Poetry in Translation (3). Introduction to the lyric and elegiac poetry of antiquity in English translation, including Hesiod, Sappho, Catullus, Ovid, and Horace.

364 The Classical Background of English Poetry (CMPL 364) (3). Study of classical writers’ influence on selected genres of English poetry.

391 Junior Seminar (3). Prerequisite, junior standing. All departmental majors will jointly explore the history, archaeology, art and literature of one or more geographical regions of the Mediterranean. Several oral and written reports; seminar format.

396 Topics in Classical Studies (3). Students may suggest to the chair of the department topics for individual or group study. Advance arrangements required.

409 Historical Literature Greek and Roman (3). The study in English translation of selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, Tacitus, and others, with consideration of their literary qualities and their readability as historians.

415 Roman Law (3). Introduction to Roman Law, public and private. On the basis of Roman texts in translation (or the original if desired), consideration of the principles of Roman constitutional law and the legal logic and social importance of Roman civil law.

540 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3 each). Permission of the department.

541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

547 Approaches to Women in Antiquity (3). Permission of the instructor. Graduate students and senior classics majors. Intensive interdisciplinary introduction to women in antiquity, using literary, historical, and visual materials.

691H Honors Course (3 each). Honors course for departmental majors in classical archaeology, classical civilization, Greek, and Latin.

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GREK – Greek

101 /102 Elementary Classical Greek (4 each). Comprehensive coverage of basic grammar and syntax in two semesters, preparing students for reading Plato or Xenophon in Greek 203 (and with instructor’s permission, New Testament Greek in GREK 205).

121 Elementary Modern Greek (4 each). Essential elements of the structure and vocabulary of modern Greek and aspects of Greek culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order. Continues proficiency-based instruction, with emphasis on development and refinement of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills including a review and continuation of grammar.

122 Elementary Modern Greek II (4). Continuation of GREK 121.

203 Intermediate Greek (3 each). Prerequisites, GREK 101 and 102. Review of fundamentals; reading in selected classical texts, such as Xenophon, Plato, Euripides, or others.

204 Intermediate Greek II (3). Continuation of GREK 203.

205 Greek New Testament (3). Prerequisite, GREK 203.

221 Advanced Greek I (3). Substantial readings from Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, the remainder of the selected poems to be read in translation.

222 Advanced Greek II (3). Readings from one or more Greek Tragedies.

351 Classical Greek Prose (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221. Readings in Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, or other authors. With permission of the department, this course may be repeated for credit.

352 Greek Poetry (3). Prerequisite, GREK 222. Readings in Sappho, Aeschylus, and other authors. With permission of the department, this course may be repeated for credit.

396 Special Readings in Greek Literature (3). Prerequisite, GREK 222.

409 Greek New Testament (RELI 409) (3). Prerequisite, GREK 222. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

506 Greek Dialects (LING 506) (3). Permission of the instructor. Survey of the major dialects of Classical Greek and study of their derivation from Common Greek. Texts include both literary and epigraphical sources from the eighth century BCE to the Hellenistic Period.

507 Greek Composition (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221. Goslin.

508 Readings in Early Greek Poetry (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or GREK 222. Race.

509 Readings in Greek Literature of the Fifth Century (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or GREK 222. Baragwanath, Goslin.

510 Readings in Greek Literature of the Fourth Century (3). Prerequisite, GREK 221 or GREK 222. Staff.

540 / 541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

722 Greek Epigraphy (3). Staff.

744 Introduction to Greek Law

750 Homer (3). Race.

753 Greek Lyric Poetry (3). Race.

755 Greek Tragedy (3). Goslin, Race.

757 Sophocles (3). Race.

759 Greek Comedy (3). Staff.

761 Greek Philosophical Literature (3).

763 Greek Historical Literature (3). Staff.

765 Thucydides (3). Baragwanath.

767 Greek Rhetoric and Oratory (3). Wooten.

769 Demosthenes (3). Wooten.

771 Hellenistic Poetry (3). Staff.

775 Later Greek Prose (3). Staff.

841 Special Reading (3). Fall and spring. Staff.

901 Greek Seminars (3). Topics vary from year to year. Staff.

993 Master’s Thesis (3 or more). Fall and spring. Staff.

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3 or more). Fall and spring. Staff.

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LATN – Latin

101/102 Elementary Latin (4 each). The basic elements of Latin grammar, practice in reading and writing Latin, introduction to Roman civilization through a study of the language of the Romans.

111 Accelerated Beginning Latin (4). Permission of the instructor and the director of the elementary Latin program. Taught in conjunction with LATN 601 in the fall and independently in the spring. Introduction to Latin grammar (the material covered in LATN 101 and 102). Students meet for a fourth session dedicated to Latin prose composition.

203/204 Intermediate Latin (3). Review of fundamentals. Reading in selected texts such as Catullus, Ovid, Cicero, or others.

205 Medieval Latin (3). Prerequisite, LATN 203.

212 Accelerated Intermediate Latin (4). Prerequisite, LATN 102 or LATN 111. Permission of the director of the intermediate Latin program. Taught in conjunction with 602 in the spring. Review of Latin grammar, vocabulary building, and development of reading and translation skills. Students meet for fourth session devoted to grammar, style, and poetics.

221 Vergil (3). Prerequisite, LATN 204. Systematic review of Latin grammar. Reading in Virgil’s Aeneid, normally two books in Latin, and the remainder in translation. First-year and sophomore elective.

222 Cicero: The Man and His Times (3). Prerequisite, LATN 204. Careful reading of selected works of Cicero, exercises in Latin composition.

223 Ovid (3). Prerequisite, LATN 204. Systematic review of Latin grammar. Reading in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, normally two books in Latin, and the remainder in translation. First-year and sophomore elective.

331 Roman Historians (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Readings in Caesar, Sallust, and/or Livy.

332 Roman Comedy (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Readings in Plautus and Terence, or both.

333 Lyric Poetry (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Reading in Catullus and Horace.

334 Augustan Poetry (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Reading in Ovid, Tibullus, Propertius, or other poets.

335 Roman Elegy (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Permission of instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course studies Ovid, Propertius, and Tibullus, focusing on themes such as love, male-female relations, politics, war, Roman culture, and poetry itself.

351 Lucretius (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Reading in Lucretius and related works.

352 Petronius and the Age of Nero (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221.

353 Satire (Horace and Juvenal) (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221.

354 Tacitus and Pliny’s Letters (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221.

396 Special Readings in Latin Literature (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221. Permission of instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

510 Introductory Latin Composition (3). Prerequisite, LATN 222. Review of Latin grammar and idiom, exercises in composition, introduction to stylistics. Rives.

511 Readings in Latin Literature of the Republic (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. Rives.

512 Readings in Latin Literature of the Augustan Age (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. James.

513 Readings in Latin Literature of the Empire (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. Wooten.

514 Readings in Latin Literature of Later Antiquity (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. Babcock.

530 An Introduction to Medieval Latin (3). Prerequisite, LATN 221 or 222. Survey of medieval Latin literature from its beginnings through the high Middle Ages. Babcock.

540 / 541 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3 each). Permission of the department.

601/602 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students (3 each). These courses are designed as a preparation for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees. Passing the examination at the end of 602 certifies that the requirement has been satisfied; although the course does not count for gradate credit. One semester each. Staff.

722 Latin Epigraphy (3). Staff.

723 Latin Paleography (3). Babcock.

724 Latin Textual Criticism (3). Babcock.

725 Latin Composition and Prose Styles (3). Wooten.

753 Fragments of Early Latin Poetry (3). Staff.

762 Roman Historical Literature (3). Study of Sallust, Caesar, Suetonius, or the minor historians of the empire. Rives.

764 Roman Dramatic Literature (3). Study of the comedies of Plautus and Terence or the tragedies of Seneca. James.

765 Roman Lyric and Elegiac Poetry (3). Study of the forms of lyric and elegiac poetry with special attention to Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, or Propertius. James.

766 Roman Satire (3). Study of the development of satiric forms with special attention to Horace or Juvenal. Staff.

767 Ovid and Literary Theory (3). Introduction to literary theory through a study of Ovid and scholarly approaches to his poetry. James.

768 Horace and Catullus (3).

770 Topics in Medieval Latin Literature (3). Reading in selected medieval Latin prose and verse authors. Babcock.

771 Cicero: Political Career (3).

772 Cicero: Literary Career (3). Wooten.

773 Lucretius (3). O’Hara.

774 Virgil (3). O’Hara.

775 Livy (3). Staff.

776 Ovid (3). O’Hara, James.

780 Petronius (3). Wooten.

784 Tacitus (3). Rives.

841 Special Reading (3). Fall and spring. Staff.

901 Latin Seminars (3 each). Topics vary from year to year. Staff.

993 Master’s Thesis (3 or more). Fall and spring. Staff.

994 Doctoral Dissertation (3 or more). Fall and spring. Staff.

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