Cicek Beeby awarded two grants for cemeteries study

Cicek Beeby has been awarded two UNC grants that will support her research as she launches her dissertation work on the organization and distribution of cemeteries across Greek settlements in the Geometric period.

The first grant is the Pre-Dissertation Travel Award from the Center for Global Initiatives (CGI)—this award is designed to help PhD candidates conduct preliminary research in preparation for writing a dissertation proposal. Cicek will use the funds to travel to Greece in August and select case studies for her dissertation.

The second award is the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) Graduate Fellowship for 2015-2016. This fellowship will assist Cicek in navigating the digital components of her dissertation. In the fall, she plans on creating social network models of how people are connected to each other through cemeteries. In the spring, she hopes to translate these network models into spatial distribution patterns using Geometric Athens as a test case. The fellowship provides funds for research and professional development during the academic year and concludes with a summer stipend for summer 2016.

Weiberg wins fellowship from American School

E.Weiberg

Weiberg

Graduate student Erika Weiberg has been awarded the Bert Hodge Hill Fellowship from the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. She will attend the Regular Program of the school as a Regular Student Member next year.

“Study at the ASCSA will help me integrate the material evidence offered by Greek art and epigraphy with literary analysis of texts so that we can better understand one aspect of women’s lives in ancient Greece,” Weiberg explained. Her dissertation will focus on the depiction of the traumatic effects of war on wives of returning veterans in Greek tragedy.

Weiberg becomes the third fellow from the department to join the school in the past three years. Currently Hans Hansen and Rebecca Worsham are participating in the school now.

The department’s ties to the school extend back to Eben Alexander, who formed early ties with the school during his early years as a faculty member in the department. The department’s relationship to the school was formalized when J.P. Harland was appointed as a faculty member in 1922 and our graduate program was founded. Since then, many members of the faculty have maintained our ties to the school: Henry Immerwahr was director for many years; Mary Sturgeon was a senior member, a member of the Corinth Excavations, a Whitehead Professor, and chair of the Managing Committee; and Ken Sams has long served as a voting member of the school’s Managing Committee. Donald Haggis’s archaeological site, the Azoria Project, also excavates under a permit from the school.

Earlier in the year, Weiberg also received special departmental recognition, wining the Preston H. and Miriam L. Epps Prize in Greek Studies for 2014.

 

 

BARAGAWANATH WINS VON HUMBOLDT FELLOWSHIP

Emily BaragwanathEmily Baragwanath has captured an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship that will enable her to research at Germany’s University of Heidelberg for over a year.

“I am very excited and honored to have received a Humboldt Fellowship,” Prof. Baragwanath said. “It provides me with a tremendous opportunity not only to pursue my own research, but also to engage with scholars in my field at a university that is one of the oldest and most esteemed in Europe.”

From January 2013 to June 2014, Prof. Baragwanath will work on her monograph, provisionally titled Women, Narrative, and Agency in Xenophon. She will examine Xenophon’s representation of women, how it relates to larger issues of friendship and leadership, and what it reveals about his approach to history, narrative, explanation, and literary invention.

HANSEN, WORSHAM WIN FELLOWSHIPS TO STUDY AT ASCSA

Hans Hansen and Rebecca Worsham each recently won fellowships to attend The American School of Classical Studies at Athens as regular members next year.

Rebecca Worsham

Worsham

Hansen, philology, won the James Rignall Wheeler Fellowship and Worsham, classical archaeology, the Emily Townsend Vermeule Fellowship to fund their studies. The program involves extensive travel and study of Greece with a diverse group of Classical scholars.

“This intensive program will broaden my experience as a Classicist, benefiting me as a teacher of Greek literature and civilization,” Hansen explained. “I also expect that the first-hand understanding of the Greek world offered by the program will shed light on the poetry of Pindar that I am studying for my dissertation.”

Funded by the Archaeological Institute of America’s Olivia James Traveling Fellowship, Worsham has spent the past year studying and researching her dissertation in Greece, but, like Hansen, will now undertake the ASCSA’s program because it “encourages students to engage with a spatially and temporally broad range of Greek archaeology and history.”

Hans Hansen while travelling

Hansen

“As a result of the emphasis on first-hand experience of the Greek landscape and the opportunity it provides for direct communication with a number of scholars active in the field,” Worsham said. “The program is enormously beneficial both for my own research and for my future teaching.”

Hansen and Worsham continue a long-standing tradition of UNC graduate students studying at ASCSA.

GRADUATE STUDENTS AWARDED DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIPS

Several of our graduate students are reaping the bounty of their scholarship. Patrick Dombrowski and Erika Weiberg both received Summer Research Fellowships from The Graduate School, which also granted Serena Witzke a Dissertation Completion Fellowship for the academic year of 2013-2014.

With such aid, Patrick, Erika, and Serena will be able to devote themselves to their dissertations full time during their fellowships. We applaud them for receiving such academic recognition.

UNDERGRADUATE HENRY ROSS NAMED LUCE SCHOLAR

Henry Ross, a senior Classics major with a minor in biology and a Morehead-Cain Scholar, has been awarded a competitive fellowship from the Henry Luce Foundation to live and learn in Asia for a year after he graduates this spring.

Henry Ross

Ross

The Luce Scholars Program selects 15-18 college seniors from a national pool of nominated candidates based on the students’ leadership and academic achievements. Fellows live and work in Asia for a year with the intent to gain exposure to the content as a benefit to their future careers. Ross plans to enter law school.

“I don’t yet know the specifics of my position or location in Asia, but I hope to gain valuable insight into foreign arrest, adjudication, and incarceration policies,” Ross explained.

Ross is completing his senior thesis on the depiction of the bee society in the Fourth Book of Vergil’s Georgics, one of the most challenging poems in Latin, under the direction of James J. O’Hara.

“Despite his busy schedule, he works hard, writes well, and responds well to all my comments on his drafts,” commented Prof. O’Hara.

“Henry is one of our star students–he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and he has worked on the Student Honor Court for years,” added Sharon L. James. “We are delighted to see him win this very competitive, prestigious scholarship.”

Additionally, Ross has completed graduate-level coursework in Latin and won the 2012 Preston H. and Miriam Epps Prize in Greek Studies. Beyond Carolina, he has taught in Zimbabwe and researched in Cape Town, South Africa.

“Study in the Classics Department has been my most valuable academic experience at Carolina, and vital in my preparation and selection for the Luce,” Ross reflected. “Like the department, the Luce Foundation embraces a holistic study of language, history, literature, and culture. In Asia, and in my legal career, I will rely on my background in Classics to make connections and express my ideas. The professors here who have deepened my interest in the ancient world have also exemplified rigor, integrity, collegiality, humility, attention to detail, and commitment to learning. I hope to follow their example and put to use the skills I have learned as I pursue work and study in criminal law.”

Aside from his academic work, Ross has interned for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C., and now works as the student body’s deputy student attorney general and solicitor general.

We congratulate him for this significant achievement!