Weiberg wins fellowship from American School

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E.Weiberg

Weiberg

Graduate student Erika Weiberg has been awarded the Bert Hodge Hill Fellowship from the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. She will attend the Regular Program of the school as a Regular Student Member next year.

“Study at the ASCSA will help me integrate the material evidence offered by Greek art and epigraphy with literary analysis of texts so that we can better understand one aspect of women’s lives in ancient Greece,” Weiberg explained. Her dissertation will focus on the depiction of the traumatic effects of war on wives of returning veterans in Greek tragedy.

Weiberg becomes the third fellow from the department to join the school in the past three years. Currently Hans Hansen and Rebecca Worsham are participating in the school now.

The department’s ties to the school extend back to Eben Alexander, who formed early ties with the school during his early years as a faculty member in the department. The department’s relationship to the school was formalized when J.P. Harland was appointed as a faculty member in 1922 and our graduate program was founded. Since then, many members of the faculty have maintained our ties to the school: Henry Immerwahr was director for many years; Mary Sturgeon was a senior member, a member of the Corinth Excavations, a Whitehead Professor, and chair of the Managing Committee; and Ken Sams has long served as a voting member of the school’s Managing Committee. Donald Haggis’s archaeological site, the Azoria Project, also excavates under a permit from the school.

Earlier in the year, Weiberg also received special departmental recognition, wining the Preston H. and Miriam L. Epps Prize in Greek Studies for 2014.