Cicek Beeby highlighted in Carolina Arts & Sciences Magazine

Cicek Beeby, graduate student in Classical Archaeology, is highlighted in the Fall 2016 edition of the Carolina Arts & Sciences Magazine.  The article, “A teacher digs deeper” can be found on the magazine’s website here.  The piece spotlights Cicek’s role as a trench supervisor on the Azoria Project in Crete, Greece, a  position she has held since 2012.

In January 2016, Cicek was named a winner of the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.  She is currently working on her dissertation titled “Spatial Narratives of Mortuary Landscapes in Early Iron Age Greece: A Network Approach.”

UNC Classics Department Seeks Paddison Professor in Greek Poetry

The Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been authorized to search for a distinguished colleague to join the Department as George L. Paddison Professor of Classics, with a specialization in Greek poetry.  This is a tenured position.  The Paddison Professor teaches a wide range of courses and seminars in Greek poetry and Greek and Roman literature and culture more broadly and is expected to take an active role in supervision and mentoring at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  We seek a scholar with a strong record of publication, an international reputation for excellence in research, a demonstrated commitment to first-rate teaching and mentoring, and potential for intellectual leadership and strong service.  A PhD in Classics or a related field is required.  Nominations are welcome.  The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes all to apply, including protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.  The Department especially encourages applications from women and minority candidates.

We will begin to consider applications on November 3, 2016, and continue the search until the position is filled.  Applicants apply online at http://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/106168 and attach a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and the names and contact information of four persons who would be willing to write letters of recommendation.  Referees will be contacted with instructions for submitting their letters online.  Inquiries may be addressed to Professor James O’Hara, Chair, Paddison Search Committee, at PaddisonSearch@unc.edu.  The Department’s website is www.classics.unc.edu.

 

Azoria Project Accepting Applications for Summer 2017

The Azoria Project is conducting its final full-scale excavation season in May-July 2017, and seeks student volunteers to participate as trench assistants.  The program trains students in problems, methods, and research practices in Mediterranean and Aegean archaeology by providing them with a fieldwork- and laboratory-based program in Greece.  This summer of 2017 will be the 10th excavation season and the 16th year of the Project.  Since 2002, the Azoria Project has trained over 35 graduate students in classics, archaeology, and anthropology (trench supervisors and area specialists); and more than 200 undergraduate and graduate student trench assistants.  At least 20 of our undergraduate staff members have continued into graduate work (including two NSF fellows) in classics, classical archaeology, anthropology, and archaeology.  Student participants have come from Greece, Cyprus, Turkey, the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Belgium, France, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Barbados.

The Azoria Project is the excavation of the Early Iron Age-Archaic site of Azoria (ca. 1200-500 B.C.) on the island of Crete in the Greek Aegean.  The focus is the Archaic-period city (ca. 700-480 B.C.) and the investigation of local dynamics of urbanization and sociopolitical changes in the 8th and 7th c. B.C.  Current fieldwork (2013-2017) is exploring the topography of the archaic civic center archaic-period residential complexes (6th and early 5th c. B.C), and conducting a number of stratigraphic soundings in the area of the civic buildings in order to refine our understanding of the chronology and early history of the site.

Fore more information on how to participate in the 2017 season of excavations at Azoria, please follow the links at the Project website, or contact Project Director, Donald Haggis, at dchaggis@email.unc.edu.

 

Congratulations to Our Most Recent PhDs!

2015-16 brought a bumper crop of new PhDs, and we are very pleased to report that many of them have done well in a very difficult job market:

Erika Weiberg will be starting as tenure-track Assistant Professor at Florida State University

Pablo Molina has accepted a full-time position at the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts

Katie DeBoer Simons has accepted a one-year position as Visiting Assistant Professor at Indiana University

Rebecca Worsham has accepted a two-year position as Visiting Assistant Professor at Smith College

Hans Hansen will be continuing as part-time instructor at Elon University

Robyn LeBlanc will be continuing as lecturer at UNC Greensboro

Of recent PhDs, Serena Witzke has accepted a one-year position as lecturer at the University of Illinois.

Congratulations to them all!

Colloquium in Honor of Peter M. Smith: “Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought”

On Saturday, May 28th, former students gathered in Murphey Hall to honor Peter M. Smith, Associate Professor Emeritus.  The colloquium celebrated the publication of a Festschrift for Professor Smith, edited by Arum Park and entitled Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought, which will be published later this year by Routledge.  For further information about the volume, see here.  The range and quality of papers (as well as the many impromptu anecdotes!) were a fitting tribute to the inspiring quality of Professor Smith’s teaching and mentorship during his thirty-four year career at Carolina.  Thanks are due to Professor Park for organizing the event, to all those who contributed to the volume and the colloquium, and above all to Professor Smith, for his many years of dedication to the department, to his students, and to the highest standards of scholarship and teaching.

PeterFest

Back row, left to right: Keyne Cheshire (PhD 2001), David Johnson (PhD 1996), Norman Sandridge (PhD 2005), Patrick Lee Miller (MA 2002; PhD Philosophy 2005), Mark Mash (PhD 2010), Peter Aicher (PhD 1986), Derek Smith Keyser (PhD 2011). Front row, left to right: Debbie Felton (PhD 1995), Arum Park (PhD 2009), Sheila Murnaghan (PhD 1980), Jeffrey Beneker (PhD 2002), Edwin Carawan (PhD 1980), Mary Pendergraft (PhD 1982) Seated: Peter Smith


From May 24, 2016:

The Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host a colloquium titled “Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought” to celebrate the teaching and scholarship of Associate Professor Emeritus Peter M. Smith, and the publication of the volume dedicated to him.  The colloquium will be held in Murphey Hall room 104, on Saturday, May 28.

If you are interested in reading more about the publication, it can be found here.

From the editor, Arum Park:

“As has long been acknowledged, literature–or any art form–is a resemblance or representation of reality or of some conception of reality in the artist’s mind.  Philosophers such as Plato recognized this distinction between reality and resemblance, but this recognition appears in many genres of Greek literature outside the realm of philosophy.  This colloquium explores the themes of resemblance and reality in Greek thought, as reflected in genres such as philosophy, epic, lyric, Hellenistic poetry, historiography, and Greek tragedy.

What these papers also share is the influence of Peter M. Smith, whose kindness and intellectual mentorship we celebrate with this colloquium.”

Further details about the colloquium can be found here.

Colloquium in Honor of Peter M. Smith: “Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought” May 28, 2016

The Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host a colloquium titled “Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought” to celebrate the teaching and scholarship of Associate Professor Emeritus Peter M. Smith, and the publication of the volume dedicated to him.  The colloquium will be held in Murphey Hall room 104, on Saturday, May 28.

If you are interested in reading more about the publication, it can be found here.

From the editor, Arum Park:

“As has long been acknowledged, literature–or any art form–is a resemblance or representation of reality or of some conception of reality in the artist’s mind.  Philosophers such as Plato recognized this distinction between reality and resemblance, but this recognition appears in many genres of Greek literature outside the realm of philosophy.  This colloquium explores the themes of resemblance and reality in Greek thought, as reflected in genres such as philosophy, epic, lyric, Hellenistic poetry, historiography, and Greek tragedy.

What these papers also share is the influence of Peter M. Smith, whose kindness and intellectual mentorship we celebrate with this colloquium.”

Further details about the colloquium can be found here.

Jordan Preuss Awarded Oxford’s Ertegun Scholarship

J Preuss 1Jordan Preuss, a recent graduate of the Post-Baccalaureate program has been named a recipient of a Ertegun Scholarship at Oxford University.  Jordan will be a member of Merton College where she plans to study Greek and Latin linguistics during her first year, Papyrology during her second year, and to work throughout on a thesis analyzing the Greek-language rhetoric of the Persian characters in Herodotus.

The Ertegun Graduate Scholarship Programme in the Humanities brings together the world’s top graduate students in the humanities with Oxford’s community of scholars in a “unique setting that fosters dialogue across academic disciplines, across cultures and across generations.”  Scholars attend Oxford cost-free and have access to lectures, seminars, and concerts designed especially for the programme.

See here for the press release issued by the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.  They have also issued a Twitter announcement.

Summer Session Registration begins Monday, March 21!

The Classics Department is seeking students for summer coursework in 2016!  Courses offered this summer include Sex and Gender in Antiquity, Medical Terminology, Egyptian Archaeology, and Classical Mythology.  Summer study offers a great opportunity to learn about the ancient world in a small class with many exciting activities such as visits to local museums and performances.  These classes also fulfill several general education requirements.

Course Descriptions

CLAR 242 Egyptian Archaeology – Maymester (May 11-27) M-F, 9:00 am – 12:15 pm
This Maymester course is an introductory survey of the archaeology, art and architecture of ancient Egypt, ranging in time from the prehistoric cultures of the Nile Valley through the New Kingdom.  While the course will examine famous features and characters of ancient Egypt, it will also provide a wide-ranging review of the archaeology of this remarkable land as well as the method and theories used to understand ancient Egypt.  Attention will be placed on how major sites and artifacts contribute to our understanding of the Egyptian world-view and its visual expression.  Students will also have the opportunity to examine ancient Egyptian objects first-hand through in-class activities and visits to local museums.  This course satisfies the following general education categories: World before 1750 (WB); and Beyond the North Atlantic World (BN).  Prerequisites: none.
Prof. Jennifer Gates-Foster | jgatesfoster@unc.edu

CLAS 242 Sex and Gender in Antiquity – Summer Session I (May 11-June 16) **Cross-listed with WMST 242** M-F, 1:15 pm – 2:45 pm
The purpose of this course is to explore gender constructs, what it meant to be a woman or a man in antiquity, as revealed in literary, historical and archaeological sources.  Throughout the five-and-a-half week course we will analyze and discuss ancient attitudes and ideas about love, sexuality, normative and non-binary gender, and more.  The primary readings will be from Homer, Euripides, Plato, Ovid, Petronius, and other ancient authors.  Additional readings drawn from the field of gender studies will serve to highlight the primary texts’ issues and their relevance for our contemporary society.  This course satisfies the following general education categories: Historical Analysis (HS), North Atlantic World (NA), and World before 1750 (WB).  Prerequisites: none.
Instructor: Keith Penich | kpenich@live.unc.edu

CLAS 126 Medical Terminology – Summer Session II (June 20-July 26) M-F, 1:15 pm – 2:45 pm
Gain access to the imposing language of the medical profession through a systematic study of word roots taken from ancient Greek and Latin, the languages of doctors and philosophers from the time of Hippocrates.  Prerequisites: none.
Instructor: Andrew Ficklin | aficklin@live.unc.edu

CLAS 131 Classical Mythology – Summer Session II (June 20-July 26) M-F, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the stories about gods, goddesses, and heroes that were told and retold throughout antiquity.  Reading and discussion will emphasize not only the stories themselves, but also their historical and cultural context.  How were myths transmitted in ancient times?  What roles did they play in Greco-Roman culture?  What can we learn from them about the ways that ancient Greeks and Romans understood the world around them?  In our explorations we will concentrate on literary texts, especially epic and tragedy, but will also examine visual representations of myths in painting and sculpture.  Alongside daily class discussion, this course will include visits to the Ackland Art Museum, viewings of modern film adaptations of myths, and scavenger hunts for mythological symbolism on UNC’s campus.  This course satisfies the following general education requirements: Literary Arts (LA).  Prerequisites: none.
Instructor: Tedd Wimperis | wimperis@email.unc.edu

Philip Wilson named recipient of CAMWS Manson A. Stewart Award

Classics major Philip Wilson has been named a winner of the 2015-2016Phil pic
Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS) Manson A. Stewart Undergraduate Award.  The awards are given to a limited number of Classics majors at the sophomore and junior level at CAMWS Universities who have been nominated by their professors.  Awards will be given at the annual CAMWS meeting held in Williamsburg, VA in mid-March.  More information about the award can be found here.

Katie De Boer Simons wins CAMWS Presidential Award

Katie De Boer Simons has been named the winner of the Presidential Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper at the annual meeting of the Classics Association of the Middle West and South.  Katie will present her paper, “Blaming Helen: Inconsistency in Aeneid 6 and Odyssey 24″ at the 2016 CAMWS meeting held in Williamsburg, VA this month.  More information about the award can be found here.